Monthly Archives: March 2007

'Filmmaking at CRP' featured on the Daily Star, Bangladesh website

Filmmaking at CRP: A giant step for the differently abledFilmmaking at CRP: A giant step for the differently abled
by Kavita Charanji

Truly as the visually and hearing impaired Helen Keller once said, when one door of happiness closes another opens. This thought comes to mind when one visits the Savar-based Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP). Over the years the residents, despite their impairment have acquired a range of skills such as painting, jewellery making, drama, administration, computers, electronics and shop management.

And there’s more — filmmaking. When The Daily Star correspondent dropped in at Savar a seven- member crew was busy discussing the nitty gritties of a series of three documentary films on CRP and its members. Under the able guidance of London-based filmmaker Jibunnessa Abdullah, the group is to interview, shoot and edit the film. The group was in the process of firming up questions for an interview with Mahiuddin Babul, who fell from a mango tree in 1985 and became paralysed. The enterprising Babul makes a good subject for the film since he has set up a small electronics business in Dhaka after a degree in electronics from Polytechnic Institute, Dhaka.

Among the questions that will come the way of Babul are how long he has been at CRP, why is he in a trolley, the training he has received, life after the accident, his marriage and the problems he faces. As Jibunnessa says, “Even if some buildings have lifts, the wheel chair users have to negotiate steps. We will be looking at Babul’s home in Dhaka which has been adapted to his needs — as for example a ramp, an accessible toilet. Often rented homes have no wheelchair access, narrow doors, the kitchen stove is too high or low and the electric switches may be too high.”

The film that is in making is geared to generate awareness about disability, discuss the achievements of CRP residents and try to erase the taboos and myths that surround such wheelchair users.

To read the full story click here

‘Filmmaking at CRP’ featured on the Daily Star, Bangladesh website

Filmmaking at CRP: A giant step for the differently abledFilmmaking at CRP: A giant step for the differently abled
by Kavita Charanji

Truly as the visually and hearing impaired Helen Keller once said, when one door of happiness closes another opens. This thought comes to mind when one visits the Savar-based Centre for the Rehabilitation of the Paralysed (CRP). Over the years the residents, despite their impairment have acquired a range of skills such as painting, jewellery making, drama, administration, computers, electronics and shop management.

And there’s more — filmmaking. When The Daily Star correspondent dropped in at Savar a seven- member crew was busy discussing the nitty gritties of a series of three documentary films on CRP and its members. Under the able guidance of London-based filmmaker Jibunnessa Abdullah, the group is to interview, shoot and edit the film. The group was in the process of firming up questions for an interview with Mahiuddin Babul, who fell from a mango tree in 1985 and became paralysed. The enterprising Babul makes a good subject for the film since he has set up a small electronics business in Dhaka after a degree in electronics from Polytechnic Institute, Dhaka.

Among the questions that will come the way of Babul are how long he has been at CRP, why is he in a trolley, the training he has received, life after the accident, his marriage and the problems he faces. As Jibunnessa says, “Even if some buildings have lifts, the wheel chair users have to negotiate steps. We will be looking at Babul’s home in Dhaka which has been adapted to his needs — as for example a ramp, an accessible toilet. Often rented homes have no wheelchair access, narrow doors, the kitchen stove is too high or low and the electric switches may be too high.”

The film that is in making is geared to generate awareness about disability, discuss the achievements of CRP residents and try to erase the taboos and myths that surround such wheelchair users.

To read the full story click here